Tom Langton

I’m just back from a very interesting/successful two days in Suffolk with Tom Langton – the first spent around the site of the proposed Sizewell C reactor, the second interviewing Tom himself: in the morning we talked about the badger cull (Tom, an ecologist specialising in epidemiology, has some very forthright things to say about the badger cull, which he says is basically built around an error in interpreting data); in the afternoon we talked about amphibians and ponds (Tom was a founder of Froglife, and is an expert on Great Crested Newts).

In between I met up with the charismatic John Burton at the offices of the World Land Trust (interviews have been promised with John and his team and will be finalised asap!), and wandered around Tom’s land – twenty-five incredibly beautiful organic acres of rural Suffolk, where he and his partner Cath have dug out nineteen ponds, planted hundreds of trees, and allowed the return of flower-rich grassland.

It’s genuinely astonishing driving through miles of intensively managed farmland to turn down a long farm track and find this oasis. The land is still in the process of returning to the state Tom wants, but Turtle Doves breed here, butterflies abound, and those ponds are heaving with Great Crested Newts and other amphibians. Underneath corrugated sheets lurk Slow Worms and bees nest under the eaves of the house along with bats and a pair of Jackdaws.

It’s the kind of place you’d never want to leave, the result of many, many years of hard work – and from this island of biodiversity (surrounded by chemical-spraying farmers and a goddam pheasant shoot) Tom works on a pile of Judicial reviews, sends streams of letters advising campaigners and activists, and – on behalf of wildlife everywhere – fights back!

It’ll take a while to edit up the conversations, but they will be well worth hearing when I do!

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